Hernia Surgery

We’re here to help. For adult hernia appointments, please call (203) 276-5959. For pediatric hernias, call (203) 276-5912.

 

Alternatively you may fill out our form, and we’ll contact you to make an appointment.


What to Know About Hernia Surgery

The Hernia Center offers a comprehensive approach to hernia care. Our team supports, treats, and guides you and your family throughout the entire process, from the initial visit through recovery.

  • Though often not talked about, hernias are quite common. They occur when the abdomen or groin muscles become weak from aging or repeated strains. In turn, an organ or tissue bulges through the muscle wall, possibly causing pain.
  • While typically located in the groin area, hernias can also occur in the abdomen as with an umbilical hernia, most commonly found in babies, and in the upper thigh region.
  • Whether you have been diagnosed with a small hernia or have a more complex situation, we will work with you to create the right care plan. By addressing the hernia sooner rather than later, the treatment is typically easier because the hole size hasn’t grown over time.
  • Stamford Health is a proud participant in the Abdominal Core Health Quality Collaborative (ACHQC), focusing on quality improvement efforts to assist surgeons to perform at their highest level.

Meet The Hernia Center Team

Amanda  Patel
General Surgery

(203) 276-5959

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William J Symons
Surgical Critical Care, General Surgery, Trauma Surgery

(203) 276-5959

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James  Feeney
Surgical Critical Care

(203) 276-5959

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Kevin M Dwyer
Surgical Critical Care, General Surgery, Trauma Surgery

(203) 276-5959

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Kevin D. Miller
General Surgery

(203) 276-5959

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Types Of Hernia Surgery Offered

From pre-surgery recommendations such as a nutrition or exercise plan to post-surgery physical therapy, everything we do is designed to help you heal and recover more quickly.

HerniaSurgery 1

MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGERY

Most hernia repairs can be performed with a laparoscopic or robotic device, leading to a faster recovery and less pain.
HerniaSurgery 2

OPEN SURGERY

Our surgeons make a small incision over the groin, cutting through the muscle layers and repairing the fascia. We either use stitches or a piece of mesh which helps strengthen the abdominal wall.
HerniaSurgery 3

PEDIATRIC SURGERY

Hernia surgery is one of the most common pediatric surgeries. Every precaution is taken by our team so that your child has a safe anesthetic experience, and most children can go home the same day.


Take A Look Inside Our Facilities


Risk Factors For Developing Hernias

ABDOMINAL WEIGHT GAIN

Those who struggle with obesity or excess weight in the midsection may experience a hernia because of the stretching of the abdominal wall.

CHRONIC COUGHING

This can lead to increased strain on the abdominal wall so that a hernia may form.

GENETICS

Some people are just prone to hernia development because their connective tissue and fascia are inherently weaker.

HEAVY LIFTING

Weightlifting or picking up heavy objects can increase intra-abdominal pressure, causing a hernia.

PREGNANCY

Hormones that are released during pregnancy allowing for the abdominal wall to stretch increases the likelihood of a hernia.

SURGICAL PROCEDURES ON THE ABDOMINAL WALL

Previous surgery on the abdominal wall may weaken it, especially if a surgical site infection occurs because it inhibits healing of the fascia.

ABDOMINAL WEIGHT GAIN

Those who struggle with obesity or excess weight in the midsection may experience a hernia because of the stretching of the abdominal wall.

CHRONIC COUGHING

This can lead to increased strain on the abdominal wall so that a hernia may form.

GENETICS

Some people are just prone to hernia development because their connective tissue and fascia are inherently weaker.

HEAVY LIFTING

Weightlifting or picking up heavy objects can increase intra-abdominal pressure, causing a hernia.

PREGNANCY

Hormones that are released during pregnancy allowing for the abdominal wall to stretch increases the likelihood of a hernia.

SURGICAL PROCEDURES ON THE ABDOMINAL WALL

Previous surgery on the abdominal wall may weaken it, especially if a surgical site infection occurs because it inhibits healing of the fascia.

Meet Our Vice Chair, Dr. William J. Symons

At the Stamford Health Hernia Center, our surgeons, led by William J. Symons, MD, FACS, follow evidence-based practices using the latest technology and treatments. We perform thousands of hernia repair surgeries each year and always recommend the best plan based on your condition and needs.

Dr. Symon’s areas of clinical expertise include advanced laparoscopic surgery, robotic surgery, emergency general surgery, trauma surgery, enterocutaneous fistula takedown, care for the critically ill surgical patient, and burn and wound management.

MORE ABOUT DR. WILLIAM J. SYMONS


Hernia Surgery FAQs

  • Do hernias go away on their own?

    First, it’s important that you are properly diagnosed and confirm with your general surgeon that you do in fact have a hernia. Other disease processes can sometimes be mistaken for hernias. If you do have a hernia, it’s important for you and your provider to monitor its progression and review treatment options that are right for you.

    REQUEST A CONSULTATION
  • What are the risks of not treating a hernia?
    Often, a part of the intestine pushes through a tear in the abdominal wall and a soft bulge is seen underneath the skin where the hernia has occurred. The risk is that this bowel can get stuck in the hernia, leading to an incarcerated hernia. This can cause the blood supply to be cut off and the hernia can quickly, within the space of six hours, go from an incarcerated hernia to a strangulated hernia. This strangulation of the blood supply leads to necrosis (death) of this piece of bowel and spillage of the bowel contents, which can lead to sepsis and even death. This is why hernias are usually surgically repaired on an elective basis to avoid these complications. To contact someone at Stamford Health about hernia concerns or questions, visit our Hernia Center Contact page.
  • How can I manage pain after hernia surgery?
    Your recovery experience will be unique to you depending on your condition and the treatment, as well as your threshold for pain. However, most patients can generally take over-the-counter pain medication after surgery to alleviate minor aches and pains from hernia surgery. Prescription medication is also prescribed after surgery, so it is available to you if you need it.
  • What is the typical recovery time after hernia surgery?
    Most laparoscopic and open hernia surgeries do not require an overnight stay. The most common form of hernias are inguinal (groin) hernias and surgery usually takes about 45 minutes. Recovery time will depend on your condition and treatment, but many patients are able to return to work and their normal routines after three to four days. Recovery time is different for everyone so it’s important to discuss any concerns you may have with your surgeon.
  • Is mesh safe for my hernia?
    Over the last 40 years all of the medical data has supported the use of mesh in hernia repair to greatly decrease the risk of recurrence but there have been concerns related to this due to reported complications with mesh products that have since been recalled. Our hernia surgeons are here to address any questions or concerns you may have about this and to further improve hernia care nationally.
  • Is anesthesia needed for hernia surgery?
    Hernia surgery typically requires anesthesia to ensure comfort and pain management during the procedure. The specific type of anesthesia utilized will be thoroughly discussed during your consultations. Our dedicated team is committed to addressing any concerns you may have regarding the anesthesia process.
  • Does insurance cover hernia surgery, and how can you check my coverage?
    Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer’s customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

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